Svenska nyheter

Autonomous and electric vehicles create scarcity for competence in Sweden

Autonomous and electric vehicles create scarcity for competence in Sweden

In recent years, the ways of the automotive industry have changed dramatically. A great focus is now on artificial intelligence, autonomous driving and the production of electric cars. Swedish brand Volvo has already fitted a number of cars with Drive Me, their driver assistance technology. Likewise, Scania is also working on autonomous transport solutions. The most highly sought after competences in the automotive industry are different now, compared with just a decade ago. Times are changing – and they are changing rapidly. How can the major players in Sweden face this challenge?

Supplementary training

Lately, several projects have been launched in Sweden to face the shift towards electric cars. Volvo Cars is about to give supplementary training to up to 20.000 of their employees in the next four years. CEO Håkan Samuelsson told Sveriges Radio, that they are about to further their employees’ knowledge in electrification.

We are facing a great shift in technology, which creates a huge demand for new competence in the company. We will further educate those already employed. During the next four years, we will educate some of our staff in electrification.

In total, Volvo Cars will have 20.000 training positions in the program.

A matter of staying relevant in the market

The shift towards electric vehicles means that tens of thousands of workers in the Swedish automotive industry are in need of new competence. In order to stay relevant in the market, both nationally and globally, the adaption of the industry needs to be successful.

The success of this adaption is not only crucial to the car companies, but to the country as a whole – the automotive industry is responsible for almost a fifth of Swedish exports. Peter Bryntesson, senior advisor at the Scandinavian Automotive Supplier Association (FKG), states that Sweden needs to be one step ahead of competing countries.

The goal is to maintain a strong, Swedish automotive industry. At the moment we are very strong, with about 17 – 20 percent of exports related to the automotive industry. We depend on it. We need to maintain our competitiveness and stay one step ahead of countries such as Germany and China.